1 day in Province of South Tyrol Itinerary

1 day in Province of South Tyrol Itinerary

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Merano
— 1 day
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Merano — 1 day

Merano or Meran is a town and comune in South Tyrol, northern Italy. On the 15th (Mon), trek along Tappeiner Promenade, then relax and rejuvenate at Terme Merano, then take in nature's colorful creations at I Giardini di Castel Trauttmansdorff, and finally get to know the fascinating history of Merano Centro Storico.

To see where to stay, more things to do, photos, and tourist information, read our Merano online trip itinerary planner.

Venice to Merano is an approximately 3-hour car ride. You can also take a train; or do a combination of train and bus. In August in Merano, expect temperatures between 35°C during the day and 19°C at night. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 15th (Mon) early enough to drive back home.
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Parks · Outdoors · Spas · Historic Sites
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Province of South Tyrol travel guide

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Bodies of Water · Ski Areas · Spas
South Tyrol, also known by its alternative Italian name Alto Adige, is an autonomous province in northern Italy. It is one of the two autonomous provinces that make up the autonomous region of Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. The province has an area of 7400km2 and a total population of 511,750 inhabitants (31.12.2011). Its capital is the city of Bolzano (German: Bozen; Ladin: Balsan or Bulsan).According to 2014 data based on the 2011 census, 62.3 percent of the population speaks German (Standard German in the written form and an Austro-Bavarian dialect in the spoken form); 23.4 percent of the population speaks Italian, mainly in and around the two largest cities (Bolzano and Merano); 4.1 percent speaks Ladin, a Rhaeto-Romance language; 10.2% of the population (mainly recent immigrants) speaks another language as first language.South Tyrol is granted a considerable level of self-government, consisting of a large range of exclusive legislative and executive powers and a fiscal regime that allows the province to retain a large part of most levied taxes, while nevertheless remaining a net contributor to the national budget. As of 2011, South Tyrol is among the wealthiest regions in Italy and the European Union.

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