Museum of the Risorgimento, Turin

4.4
#7 of 67 in Museums in Turin
The first, and largest, museum to pay homage to the risorgimento (Italian unification) movement in Italy, Museum of the Risorgimento is in one of Turin's most beautiful palaces. The original copy of Italy's national anthem, "Il Canto degli Italiani," is in the library, which houses a documentary archive and the literary works that helped to inspire the unification movement. Almost every room of the museum is filled with paintings, artifacts, and documents. In the multimedia room, watch films depicting the creation of many of Italy's Renaissance innovations, as well as the notable personalities of the risorgimento. You can ask for a touchscreen audio and visual guide at the main entrance. For Museum of the Risorgimento and beyond, use our Turin trip itinerary planner to get the most from your Turin vacation.
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Museum of the Risorgimento Reviews
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4.5
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  • having visited this museum several times lately I come to see the exhibitions that are set up in the corridor at the end of the route. in theory you should do the whole round but for those who want to see only those because they already know it can access it directly by turning right instead of left once they enter. the ticket office is located on the lower floor, where there are bathrooms and lockers to store backpacks and bags. the current exhibition, although little is related to the museum theme..., is particularly interesting. it is a great photographic project created by two photographers over a few years through Asia, Africa and Europe to document the transmission of knowledge as a teacher and student. about 200 craftsmen and teachers in the most varied arts were contacted, from which interviews and shots emerged in particular - albeit not only - the relationship between teacher and pupil. 58 images are on display, each accompanied by a short caption, which tell stories of encounters, passion for some art, walking, training and learning a trade. the shots show student and teacher while training with martial arts in Japan, harvesting and processing lotus flower in Burma, water control at SMAT in Turin, the production of handmade decorative paper in Japan, the teaching of Ayurveda medicine in India, the learning of the rhythms of nature in Siberia, the study of sacred texts. among the most beautiful images are those related to the production of indigo in Mali and the processing at Sevres manufactures in France. Comments are not boring at all and help you understand photos. 2 introductory panels help to contextualize the project but could be avoided since there is also an 11-minute video in which the 2 photographers explain their work, saying practically the same things as one of the two panels. moreover, being close, the reading is difficult because of the overlapping audio. Another short video shows 4 unexposed photos appearing in motion. the catalog is available. will remain in place until 30 May 2020. takes about an hour to visit. The price of the ticket, which also allows access to the museum, is 10 euros. The museum is open every day except Mondays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., last entry at 5 p.m.
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  • Beautiful museum, in the middle of the city. The property is impressive and overlooks a beautiful square. Inside, after climbing a huge staircase, you find yourself walking around various rooms, some of which have very beautiful ceilings. Many memorabilia and documents that tell of the history of our country. The visit is highly recommended.
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  • Thank god I have a degree in history where I studied Italy otherwise I would have understood 0% of this museum. As it stands I understood about 2%. The rooms have no real logic to them. There’s limited explanation as to what you’re looking at and why. Also it’s more a history of France than anything else. There was an exhibition with nice pictures at the end, but as always, zero context. Too bad...
  • Not conventional. Looks at the 1861 unification of Italy through influences going back to Bonaparte, The Congress of Vienna, revolutions across Europe. Ends at outbreak of WW I. Puts 19th C. Europe all in one place, focusing on Italy, using lots from the popular press on both sides. Cards in cubbies in each room explain stuff in multiple languages. Bring imagination and a love of sweep.
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